Feed aggregator

CON: A plastic bag ban would hurt business and jobs in the area - Victoria Advocate

Plastic Bag Bans - 2 hours 4 min ago

CON: A plastic bag ban would hurt business and jobs in the area
Victoria Advocate
Production of plastic bags in the Crossroads provide countless jobs between natural gas extraction, converting gas into plastic pellets and molding those pellets into something to carry groceries home. An increase in plastic bag bans would certainly ...

and more »
Categories: News Feeds

White House, USDA Give Clean Energy Sector $68 Million Boost

Triple Pundit - 3 hours 33 min ago
Following through on President Barack Obama's plans to combat climate change and boost energy productivity, the Agriculture Department on Sept. 18 announced it's providing $68 million in funding for 540 renewable energy and energy efficiency projects through the Rural Energy for America Program.

An Engineer Is Attempting To End Plastic Bottle Pollution Using Spherification ... - The Inquisitr

Plastic Pollution - 8 hours 51 min ago

The Inquisitr

An Engineer Is Attempting To End Plastic Bottle Pollution Using Spherification ...
The Inquisitr
The world is facing an acute problem of plastic pollution and the biggest contributor to the growing menace is plastic bottles used to pack and sell packaged drinking water. Design student Rodrigo García González, who has already made a name for ...

Categories: News Feeds

Some California residents rely on bottled water as wells run dry amid historic ... - Fox News

Bottled Water - 13 hours 46 min ago

SFGate

Some California residents rely on bottled water as wells run dry amid historic ...
Fox News
EAST PORTERVILLE, Calif. – Officials say hundreds of domestic wells in California's drought-parched Central Valley have run dry, leaving many residents to rely on donated bottles of drinking water. Tulare County spokeswoman Denise England said wells ...
Some California wells run dry amid droughtHouston Chronicle

all 56 news articles »
Categories: News Feeds

Campaign to Educate Residents on Yard Waste Plastic Bag Ban Begins - WFPL

Plastic Bag Bans - 16 hours 6 min ago

Campaign to Educate Residents on Yard Waste Plastic Bag Ban Begins
WFPL
Fall officially begins Tuesday, and Jefferson County's Solid Waste Authority is hoping it'll be a good season to change the way county residents bag their leaves. Earlier this year, the Waste Management District adopted a regulation that requires ...

Categories: News Feeds

“Love Will Save This Place.”

The EnvironmentaList - 16 hours 11 min ago
Why we still need wilderness in the era of climate change
Categories: Environment, News Feeds

Pileggi talks state issues with BPA - Chadds Ford Live

BPA - September 20, 2014

Pileggi talks state issues with BPA
Chadds Ford Live
Since the early 1970s, BPA has worked to foster working relationships among area businesses and generate interest in local, state and federal issues. BPA is dedicated in the pursuit of guiding and assisting new and existing businesses for sustainable ...

Categories: News Feeds

Symantec Twitter Chat Recap: “Bridging the Workforce and Diversity Gaps”

Triple Pundit - September 20, 2014
Join TriplePundit, Symantec, Shared Value Initiative and Susan McPherson on Twitter to learn about “Bridging the Workforce and Diversity Gaps." Follow along on Thursday, Sept. 18, at 10 a.m. PT / 1 p.m. ET using the hashtag #Diversity.

Guns and Butts: Recap of Coastal Cleanup Day

Heal the Bay - September 20, 2014

Communications Director Matthew King uncovers some gems amid the trash collected at today’s 25th annual Coastal Cleanup Day.

Sept. 20, 2014 -- As with my children, I love all my Coastal Cleanup Day sites equally. But I admit that one type of site holds a special place in my heart.

To promote our biggest volunteer event of the year, I’m always on the prowl for oddball stories that capture the imagination of the media and general public. And the pier sites, where teams of SCUBA divers scour the ocean bottom to remove a truly bizarre hodgepodge of lost and abandoned items, never fail to deliver.

Over the years, we have found discarded wedding gowns and WWII-era gas masks underneath the Santa Moncia Pier. We’ve had to shut down the Redondo Beach Pier site when divers plucked what that they thought was a human skull from the seabed. Tests later revealed that the object was merely a very realistic anatomical model weathered by months (years?) in the sea. After 2011's Coastal Cleanup Day, I spent a week in vain trying to track down an Encino woman, whose wallet we had found in the waves off the Santa Monica Pier. 

And this morning was no different.

In rolling surf, a team of about a dozen divers underneath the Redondo Beach Pier recovered what looked like the sliding piece of a semi-automatic handgun. Local police came down to retrieve the gun part and begin an investigation. Who knows, maybe a criminal tossed it off the pier?

Then, as I headed back to the office, I got word that divers in Malibu Pier had also found a handgun! Cue the opening theme music from “NCIS: Los Angeles.”

One side note more germane to our mission: Before finding the weapon, the Redondo divers discovered four octopuses and at least 100 crabs trapped or entangled in fishing line and other manmade trash.

The 10,004 volunteers who participated this morning in Heal the Bay’s 25th Coastal Cleanup Day didn’t unearth anything as dramatic as a cephalopod or a Glock. Instead, they helped collect and dispose of the everyday items that comprise the bulk of trash in our beaches and inland waterways – cigarette butts, food wrappers, bits of Styrofoam, plastic bottle caps and the like. Scattered in piles, this detritus looks like an archaeological dig, a telling testament to our throwaway culture and how we treat our natural places.

That said, a few unusual items made this year’s blotter of found objects. Among them: a horse saddle and cash register (Agoura Hills), a manhole cover (Compton Creek), a video promoting a transgender beauty queen contest (L.A. River) and a Pepsi soft-drink can from 1994 (King Harbor). 

Inital totals reveal that volunteers removed 26,170 pounds of trash at 45 locations. That haul adds to an already impressive amount of trash collected by Heal the Bay during Coastal Cleanup Day over the past 25 years – more than 1.7 million pounds. That’s equal to the weight of two fully loaded 747 passenger jets!

We can’t possibly clean up all the litter that mars L.A. County shorelines, rivers and parks in three hours on one Saturday. It is a great day of action and community, but education remains the lasting benefit from Coastal Cleanup Day. A single morning on the beach, creek or park will empower tens of thousands to take steps in their daily lives year round to protect our beaches, neighborhoods and waterways.

After years on this job, it’s clear to me that most Angelenos still have no idea how the stormdrain system works. So it’s enlightening to go to cleanup sites and watch our site captains explain how urban runoff carries pollution directly to local beaches. You can almost see behaviors changing when participants learn that a cigarette butt tossed carelessly on the street in Pacoima, or a fast-food wrapper chucked out of a parked car in Beverly Hills, will ultimately find its way to sea.

Coastal Cleanup Day always lifts my spirits. Besides being good media fodder, the massive volunteer mobilization affirms my belief that L.A. residents care deeply about our work and the local environment. A cross-section of greater L.A. rallies to protect what they love -- be it sororities from Cal State Northridge, soccer teams from Lincoln Heights, small business owners from Long Beach, surfer groms from Hermosa Beach or high school students from Compton. It truly takes a village to heal a bay.

Not to worry, if you missed today’s cleanup. You can still do your part. Our Programs staff hosts monthly beach cleanups throughout the year all over L.A. County. Come join us. You might be surprised about what you find.

For a photo roundup from some of today's cleanup sites, check out our Flickr album. More pictures to come!

                         Redondo Beach police officer takes possession of handgun part found at our dive site.

Categories: Oceans

San Lorenzo schools consider reverting to polystyrene food trays - Contra Costa Times

Polysterene - September 20, 2014

San Lorenzo schools consider reverting to polystyrene food trays
Contra Costa Times
SAN LORENZO -- The local school district could take what some see as a step backward, returning to polystyrene foam lunch trays after switching to cardboard ones a couple of years ago. But the San Lorenzo Unified School District's plan to convert ...

and more »
Categories: News Feeds

Bottled water must abide by gov't guidelines: Duh - China Post

Bottled Water - September 20, 2014

Bottled water must abide by gov't guidelines: Duh
China Post
During an interpellation session yesterday at the Legislative Yuan a ruling party lawmaker queried whether the government is vigilant in safeguarding the interests of the public with the election season fast approaching, where bottled water products ...

Categories: News Feeds

Industry spending big to KO bottle bill changes - Gloucester Daily Times

Bottle Bills - September 20, 2014

Industry spending big to KO bottle bill changes
Gloucester Daily Times
BOSTON — The beverage industry is pouring millions of dollars into a campaign to defeat a referendum to expand the state's bottle bill to include containers filled with non-carbonated beverages such as water, tea and sports drinks. A coalition opposed ...

Categories: News Feeds

Conaway: Facts support bottle bill expansion - Milford Daily News

Bottle Bills - September 19, 2014

Conaway: Facts support bottle bill expansion
Milford Daily News
In response to Mr. Paul W. Croeber's letter in the Sept. 14 edition ("Don't expand bottle bill, repeal it") with regard to Proposition 2. I'm afraid that he's been misinformed. Despite curbside recycling, an enormous amount of on-the-go beverages ...

Categories: News Feeds

Conaway: Facts support bottle bill expansion - MetroWest Daily News

Bottle Bills - September 19, 2014

Conaway: Facts support bottle bill expansion
MetroWest Daily News
In response to Mr. Paul W. Croeber's letter in the Sept. 14 edition ("Don't expand bottle bill, repeal it") with regard to Proposition 2. I'm afraid that he's been misinformed. Despite curbside recycling, an enormous amount of on-the-go beverages ...

Categories: News Feeds

Letter: Plastic bag ban leads to more dog waste - Glendale News Press

Plastic Bag Bans - September 19, 2014

Letter: Plastic bag ban leads to more dog waste
Glendale News Press
20, 2013, a letter from Paddi Thomas of Glendale was published in the News-Press Mailbag, appropriately titled, “No plastic bags mean more dog waste in Glendale.” Well, since the city of Los Angeles' own ban went into effect on Jan. 1, 2014, I'd have ...

Categories: News Feeds

People’s Climate March: Being a Part of Something Big

Triple Pundit - September 19, 2014
Let’s make ourselves heard loud and clear, so that 50 years from now, we have a world that is better than it is now: A world where renewable energy is the norm; where the cost of environmental externalities must be accounted for by every government; and where our children will say, "I can’t believe they still drilled for oil when I was born."

New study: Ubiquitous chemicals known as phthalates linked to childhood asthma risk

Pump Handle - September 19, 2014

About one in every 10 U.S. children is living with asthma — that’s closing in on 7 million kids. And while we have a good handle on what triggers asthma attacks and exacerbates respiratory symptoms, exactly what causes asthma in the first place is still somewhat of a mystery. However, new research points to some possible new culprits that are difficult, if not nearly impossible, to avoid.

Those culprits are phthalates, ubiquitous chemicals found in just about everything, from food packaging to shower curtains to vinyl flooring to personal care products such as fragrances and shampoos. (Phthalates are a group of chemicals that make plastics flexible and hard to break and are also used to help cosmetic products cling to the skin.) Just this week, researchers from the Columbia Center for Children’s Environmental Health at the Mailman School of Public Health published findings that children born to mothers who experienced high levels of exposure to two particular phthalates during pregnancy had a significantly higher risk of developing asthma. Specifically, they found that high maternal exposure to butylbenzyl phthalate (BBzP) and di-n-butyl phthalate (DnBP) resulted in a 72 percent and 78 percent increase, respectively, in the risk of a child developing asthma between ages 5 and 11 years old when compared to mothers with lower levels of exposure.

“Everyone from parents to policymakers is concerned by the steep rise in the number of children who develop asthma,” Robin Whyatt, study co-author and co-deputy director of the Columbia Center for Children’s Environmental Health, said in a news release. “Our goal is to try and uncover causes of this epidemic so we can better protect young children from this debilitating condition. Our study presents evidence that these two phthalates are among a range of known risk factors for asthma.”

To conduct the study, which is the first of its kind, Whyatt and her colleagues followed a group of 300 pregnant women and their children in New York City. All of the women were either African American or Dominican. Researchers measured the exposure to four different phthalates via urine samples taken during the woman’s third trimester and when the children were ages 3, 5 and 7. To control for confounding variables, the study excluded women if they used tobacco or illicit drugs or were living with diabetes, hypertension or HIV.

Phthalates were detected in 100 percent of maternal prenatal urine samples. Among the children, 154 had a history of reporting asthma-like symptoms and 94 were diagnosed with asthma. Since pretty much everyone tests positive for phthalates exposure, researchers compared women with the highest levels to those with lower levels. They found a significant association between concentrations of BBzP and DnBP metabolites during the third trimester of pregnancy and an asthma diagnosis among children ages 5 to 11 years old. However, the researchers reported their results with caution. Authors Whyatt, Matthew Perzanowski, Allan Just, Andrew Rundle, Kathleen Donohue, Antonia Calafat, Lori Hoepner, Frederica Perera and Rachel Miller write:

These findings may imply that prenatal exposure to some phthalates has effects on transient wheeze and/or nonspecific airway hyper-responsiveness. It is possible that the respiratory consequences of prenatal exposure to phthalates mimic what has been observed following prenatal exposure to cigarette smoke, where several large cohort studies have essentially established its role in recurrent wheeze in very young children. Alternatively, prenatal phthalates exposure may induce a nonspecific airway hyper-responsiveness, manifested as report of wheeze, use of asthma medication, cough or other breathing problems, that develops into clinical asthma during childhood only in a subset of children. The development of airway hyper-responsiveness is believed to have an environmental component, and develops at a very early age. Further prospective studies are needed to resolve these important clinical questions.

On the preventive side, avoiding phthalates is quite difficult, both because the chemicals are pretty much everywhere and because they’re rarely listed as an ingredient in the products we buy. The news release announcing the study results notes that several phthalates, including BBzP and DnBP, have been banned from many children’s products, but steps haven’t been taken to warn pregnant women about the possible health risks to their fetuses. This newest study builds on the researchers’ previous findings that child and prenatal exposure to certain phthalates is associated with a higher risk of asthma-related airway inflammation and childhood eczema. Like many environmental exposure risks, limiting exposure to phthalates in an effective way will likely take action from policy-makers and regulators.

“While it is incumbent on mothers to do everything they can to protect their child, they are virtually helpless when it comes to phthalates like BBzP and DnBP that are unavoidable,” said study co-author Rachel Miller, co-deputy director of the Columbia Center for Children’s Environmental Health. “If we want to protect children, we have to protect pregnant women.”

According to the American Lung Association, asthma is the third leading cause of hospitalization among children younger than 15 years old. Every year, the chronic respiratory disease results in about $50.1 billion in direct health care costs.

To read the full study, which was published this week in Environmental Health Perspectives, click here.

Kim Krisberg is a freelance public health writer living in Austin, Texas, and has been writing about public health for more than a decade.

Categories: Health

Keep Big Energy out of climate talks!

Climate change affects all of us, and it's having a devastating impact on our planet every day. But while we work to combat it, Big Energy is jumping at every opportunity during high-level climate talks to advance its own interests and undermine progress. Join us in calling on UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon and UNFCCC Executive Secretary Christiana Figueres to keep Big Energy out of the climate treaty talks and create meaningful global policies free from corporate influence.

Take Action
Categories: Business

Energy Northwest picked for BPA pilot project - Mid Columbia Tri City Herald

BPA - September 19, 2014

Mid Columbia Tri City Herald

Energy Northwest picked for BPA pilot project
Mid Columbia Tri City Herald
In the past, BPA has provided balancing services using its hydro system to provide more or less electricity as needed. But if a hydroelectric generator is being used for balancing, it can only run at partial capacity so generation can be ramped up ...

Categories: News Feeds

'Hi, do you have water?' In a Central Calif. town, answer is often no. - Los Angeles Times

Bottled Water - September 19, 2014

'Hi, do you have water?' In a Central Calif. town, answer is often no.
Los Angeles Times
She figured that while she was at it, she should bring them water. The Porterville Recorder ran an article that gave her phone number and address and said she was collecting bottled water for drought victims. The next day there were pallets of plastic ...

Categories: News Feeds
Syndicate content
лысенко егэ по математике 2014 spy mobile biz review мобильная телефонная база в спб track any cell phone поиск людей по фамилии и возрасту телефонная база how программа справочник база данных телефонов городских на сайте местоположение ссылка поиск тут местонахождение абонента на карте cell phone spy software on the news телефонный справочник севастополь 2013 поиск людей имени и фамилии ссылка определение местоположения на телефон Уфич в дапоксетин цена Блог sitemap