Climbers slide back in to base camp

Breast Cancer Fund - June 18, 2014
Many of the climbers glissaded, or slid, back to base camp as you can see below. Leslie Kelly, Bridget Vanoni, Marlyss Bird, Lucas Parsons, Arthur Morgan, Lindsey Dal Parto, Tessa Montgomery, Cathy Ann Taylor, Frederique Mary, Barbara Winter and Maryann...
Categories: Health

2014 Team members reach personal summits

Breast Cancer Fund - June 18, 2014
It's incredibly rare for a whole Climb Against the Odds team to make it this far, and we are so proud of our whole team. Twenty of the 25 climbers have reached the pinnacle of Mt. Shasta: Arthur Morgan Lindsey...
Categories: Health

Second group of climbers reach Mt. Shasta summit

Breast Cancer Fund - June 18, 2014
Robert Abramowitz, Ruth Walter, Katie Bernell and Cristin Bailey have made it 14,179 feet to the top of Mt. Shasta! Ruth Walter lived only one mile away from Ground Zero on 9/11 and was breast feeding her daughter. After that...
Categories: Health

First climbers reach the summit

Breast Cancer Fund - June 18, 2014
We have confirmation that at least three people have reached the summit and others are close behind. Leslie Kelly, her daughter Bridget Vanoni and the North Face-sponsored climber, Marlyss Bird, have all reached the summit! Leslie Kelly was diagnosed with...
Categories: Health

Base camp volunteers dedicated to climbers

Breast Cancer Fund - June 18, 2014
Past climber and 2014 Sacred Trekker, LaDawn Beardsley, one of our dedicated volunteers working at base camp needs to stand on one foot and reach as high as she can to get cell phone service so she can remain in...
Categories: Health

Global Energy Sector Must Prepare for Climate Change, Report Says

Yale Environment 360 - June 18, 2014
Power plants and energy systems around the world will experience potentially disastrous effects from climate change and should develop plans for dealing with those effects, according to a report released today by the World Energy Council and European researchers. Long-term droughts, for example, could threaten water supplies needed to cool large power plants as they produce electricity, the report notes. Many energy facilities are also lacking protection from floods, rising seas, and severe weather events — a problem highlighted by the 2011 Fukushima nuclear disaster. Strong global political action could have major impacts on the energy sector, the report says, especially if governments make a coordinated effort to invest in renewable and low-carbon energy and upgrades to power distribution grids.
Categories: Environment, Health

Global Energy Sector Must Prepare for Climate Change, Report Says

Yale Environment 360 - June 18, 2014
Power plants and energy systems around the world will experience potentially disastrous effects from climate change and should develop plans for dealing with those effects, according to a report released today by the World Energy Council and European researchers. Long-term droughts, for example, could threaten water supplies needed to cool large power plants as they produce electricity, the report notes. Many energy facilities are also lacking protection from floods, rising seas, and severe weather events — a problem highlighted by the 2011 Fukushima nuclear disaster. Strong global political action could have major impacts on the energy sector, the report says, especially if governments make a coordinated effort to invest in renewable and low-carbon energy and upgrades to power distribution grids. Making energy systems resilient to climate change in the coming decade will require hundreds of billions of dollars from governments and industries around the globe, but most of that money is already slated to be spent keeping the current systems running, the report says.
Categories: Environment, Health

Climbers reach 12,400 feet

Breast Cancer Fund - June 18, 2014
The following climbers are at the top of the West Face (~12,400 feet) and the rest are close behind: Arthur Morgan Frederique Mary Marlyss Bird Leslie Kelly Bridget Vanoni Lindsey Dal Porto Robert Abramowitz Ruth Walter Katie Bernell Cristin Bailey...
Categories: Health

Likely to Glissade

Breast Cancer Fund - June 18, 2014
We hear from our guides that the winds are low and at about 40 degrees the conditions are good for glissading. Follow weather on the mountain at http://forecast.weather.gov/ What is glissading? Glissading is the act of descending a steep snow-covered...
Categories: Health

What would Ciro do now? Learning from a public health hero

Pump Handle - June 18, 2014

by Phyllis Freeman and Anthony Robbins, MD, MPA

One of our public health heroes, Ciro de Quadros, a public health physician from Brazil died on May 28, 2014. We need his attitude, skills, and persistence more than ever today. Ciro was a master of innovation, particularly in his efforts to prevent infectious diseases with vaccines. It seems especially timely today to review highlights of his career.

And why now? For one, because just now efforts to eliminate polio are foundering in the wake of the US CIA’s disastrous and hugely counterproductive scheme to identify Osama bin Laden’s children through a phony immunization program. The CIA’s ruse confirmed all the worst claims of vaccination opponents.

And why else? Because if we can assemble lessons from his career, they may benefit efforts to prepare public health workers to solve many other sorts of problems.

Ciro faced what seemed to most observers and colleagues to be insurmountable challenges as he tried to eliminate smallpox in Brazil and then Ethiopia.  But he always found an effective way forward. Later, when directing the Pan American Health Organization’s Division of Vaccines and Immunizations, he pioneered in broadening protection against many more vaccine-preventable diseases.  His career was one of problem solving – he never conceived of public health as a ‘discipline’ – to be defined in academic terms that might narrow his scope of activity.  Instead he learned on the go – any skill or information from any source available – redefining his role as he sized up challenge after challenge.

As we look to find a way forward after the CIA-initiated immunization reversal, and to increase commitment and urgency of public health workers – the newly arriving to public health work of any description and those continuing – we look at Ciro’s career for glimpses of what made him so effective, so relentlessly committed to solving problems, and so able to shape novel approaches and renew his own energy.

Ciro’s education and career

Ciro de Quadros lived in Brazil from his birth in 1940 until the early 1970s when his early successes caused his boss, WHO’s smallpox eradication program director, DA Henderson, to transfer Ciro to Ethiopia.  Just after medical school, Ciro had worked as chief medical officer of a public health center in the Amazon rainforest, in Altamira, a town of 5000. There he and his team (a nurse, a sanitarian, a lab technician, and a health educator) did every kind of task. Ciro, did more. He kept detailed records of everything—and by the end of that year the team knew they had vaccinated every man, woman, and child, even as they treated every sort of malady, performed surgery, dug latrines, etc. After that year he went back to school, also in Brazil, for an MPH. Then in 1969, Ciro headed back to the field, to the state of Paraná in southeastern Brazil, to be its smallpox surveillance officer.

He began earning respect for his ways of getting things done – ways that assure him a special place in public health history.  Although everyone was committed to mass vaccination against smallpox, there was no budget to do so in Paraná. Thus, Ciro tried a new and untested strategy–surveillance and containment. It was heretical, as at that time almost everyone believed that the only way to eradicate smallpox would be with mass immunization: vaccinate everyone. His experiment helped to topple ‘common wisdom’.  With a car and a nurse vaccinator, this little team chased reports of outbreaks or single cases – using local radio, a megaphone mounted on the car. They identified cases and vaccinated more than 38,000 people, anyone who may have had contact with a ‘case.’ When the mass campaign finally did go door to door later, they found not one case of smallpox.

DA Henderson lured Ciro to greater challenges in Ethiopia –where half the population lived more than a day’s walk from any road. Not only was the territory tough to traverse, but suspicions about vaccinators meant, as Ciro put it:

“You could go walking through those mountains for days and days to find a smallpox case but then you could not vaccinate anybody because nobody wanted the vaccination. They would throw stones. They would set dogs on you.”

After 6 years in Ethiopia, Ciro moved to Washington DC in 1977 – but only after having waited 6 months from when the last case of smallpox was reported in the country.

Working out of the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) headquarters in Washington DC, but traveling throughout the Americas, Ciro used the smallpox successes to lead an immunization program to cover polio, measles, diphtheria, pertussis, tetanus, tuberculosis; adding additional vaccines as they became available. To make sure that vaccines were on hand when the programs organized in each country were ready to use them, he helped create PAHO’s Revolving Fund (a novel mechanism to assure a ready supply of international currency for purchasing qualified vaccines from reliable vendors anywhere in the world at the lowest prices he could help to negotiate for bulk purchase– allowing each country to replenish the Fund’s supply of US dollars using its local currency).  We have lasting memories of watching Ciro moving in and out of the ministries of health in the Americas – just ahead of the ‘detail men’ trying to cut special deals for direct vaccine sales – to remind everyone he had a better deal for their people – and that he and PAHO would be watching…. should evidence of ‘special deals’ mean higher purchase prices, possibly with ‘unaccounted for benefits’ to any ministry staff.

While at PAHO, Ciro led the successful program to eliminate polio from the Americas, then continued to strategize the global ‘endgame’ for measles from his final professional post at the Sabin Institute, becoming Vice President Emeritus there in 2003.

How did he work?

He defined the problems he aimed to fix—in the long term and all the steps along the way. He took on every issue that blocked his ability to solve the public health problems that needed fixing – making use of every role he could play, all knowledge he could glean, all the teamwork he could promote – with the immense energy he would characteristically muster.  He saw immunization – and immunization of the most vulnerable and hardest to reach children, in remote mountain villages, or caught in war zones during active conflict, or in urban slums that shared some debilitating characteristics of war zones – as the way to engage growing throngs of contributors in improving population health.

He worked from the bottom up; he worked across the top; and he wove through all the layers, following and creating glimpses of opportunity. When working in public health, we hope our colleagues, and our students will call on lessons we learned from Ciro’s education and career.  A quick Ciro list contains these elements:

  • He pursued his education in the setting where he hoped to contribute – for Ciro in Brazil. This meant he was drawing on his local knowledge and growing awareness of the needs of the population as he prepared himself with strategies to improve health – first of villagers, then in a region within his country, then in another country with even greater needs, then for the Americas, and for the world.
  • He went right to work in the field after medical school – where he could learn more about harsh realities undermining health from the perspectives of those living in problematic environments-and from others who had been working there before him.
  • He returned to school in public health – after his village medical officer immersion – to learn more technical skills and to improve his problem solving skills once he had experienced the limits and frustrations of working on the front lines.
  • He took on tough assignments and worked his tail off – all the while nurturing co-workers of every sort and community members.
  • He always looked to learn from everyone around him – in the field or workplace – people at every level because, as he said, the best ideas may not come from those you expect to offer them.
  • He valued his work based on what he actually got done.
  • He avoided becoming isolated in a narrow field of expertise – even while he grew to be so enormously knowledgeable about several aspects of health—for Ciro, infectious diseases, epidemiology, and immunization.
  • He left no assignment without succeeding or planning a logical transition to keep up the efforts to solve whatever the problem–with all the creativity, urgency, and persistence he felt the situation called for.
  • He took the lessons he learned with him everywhere he went.
  • He taught by doing, then articulating his observations and thoughts when he thought others could see their relevance and put them right to work.

He repeated this process throughout his career.

To remind ourselves of these lessons and to provoke strategic and energetic responses to the next public health problems, we who long observed Ciro’s way of working can now simply ask ourselves: What would Ciro do?

For those who did not get to watch him in action, we have offered a small window on years of incredibly effective action. That allows us to also put before readers of this post the question: What would Ciro do now?  Whether the challenge is re-establishing trust in vaccinators (in places where the CIA must have known it put their lives in peril) or charting national strategies to protect workers from avoidable harm – remembering Ciro’s educational and career choices and stunning successes gives us a way to honor his memory.

Phyllis Freeman and Anthony Robbins, MD, MPA are the co-editors of the Journal of Public Health Policy.

 

Categories: Health

Climbers moving right along at about 12,000 feet

Breast Cancer Fund - June 18, 2014
Everyone is doing well on Mt. Shasta this morning in spite of some issues we're having with phone reception. The conditions are very good for climbing with no wind, totally clear and about 45 degrees and most of the climbers...
Categories: Health

Happy Birthday, Cristin!

Breast Cancer Fund - June 18, 2014
Today is Cristin Bailey's birthday and she'll celebrate on the mountain. “This climb is something I have wanted to do since I first learned about it in college when I attended a presentation by a climber in Maine. To say...
Categories: Health

A moonlight departure

Breast Cancer Fund - June 18, 2014
The team woke up early, ate breakfast and departed in rope teams of about five climbers plus guides for the summit attempt via Mt. Shasta's west face. Our guides have reported that everyone is doing well, and the weather is...
Categories: Health

And they're off!

Breast Cancer Fund - June 17, 2014
The Climb Against the Odds 2014 team set out from the Bunny Flat trailhead (6,950 feet) at about 10:00 this morning with our love and cheers to start them on the first leg of their journey. The group departed in...
Categories: Health

Occupational Health News Roundup

Pump Handle - June 17, 2014

Just yesterday, the Obama administration announced it would take executive action to protect certain workers against discrimination based on sexual orientation. The Associated Press reports that the president plans to sign an executive order prohibiting federal contractors from discriminating against workers based on sexual orientation and gender identity. The order is estimated to protect about 14 million workers who are not currently protected against such discrimination. The administration did not say exactly when the president would sign the executive order.

The Associated Press article cited data from the advocacy group Human Rights Campaign, which reports that it’s legal in 29 states to fire or refuse employment to a person based on sexual orientation, while 32 states don’t explicitly ban discrimination based on gender identity. While the Senate had passed similar anti-discriminatory workplace legislation last year, the issue was at a standstill in the House. Reporter Chris Johnson with the Washington Blade newspaper in Washington, D.C., quoted Rea Carey, executive director of the National Gay & Lesbian Task Force, describing the move as “a major step forward.” Carey said:

“Now millions of people will have the economic security they need to provide for their families,” Carey said. “Through his actions, the president has demonstrated again his commitment to ending discrimination. We thank all the organizations who have worked so hard to make this piece of history. This decision is good for LGBTQ people, good for our economy and good for America.”

Writer Zack Ford at Think Progress wrote that one of the largest companies that could be affected by the executive order is ExxonMobil, “which last month voted down LGBT employment protections for the 17th time. The company claims to have a ‘zero tolerance’ policy on the books for mistreatment, but that does not have the same legal force or consistency as the protections shareholders have voted down each year.” Ford also noted that 43 percent of lesbian, gay and bisexual people and 90 percent of transgender people report experiencing harassment or discrimination at work.

In other news:

The Stranger: Migrant farmworkers in Washington settled with one of the largest berry farms in the state in a case over unpaid wages and unsafe working conditions. The $850,000 legal settlement is reportedly the largest wage and hour settlement for Washington farmworkers in the state’s history.

New York Times: Neil Irwin writes in The Upshot that while the economy may be on the upswing, worker pay isn’t keeping up. Even though private-sector worker pay has gone up 49 cents an hour during the last year, the bump still wasn’t enough to keep up with inflation — that means hourly worker pay actually fell during the last year. Irwin writes: “Pause for just a second to consider that. Five years after the economic recovery began, American workers have gone the last 12 months without any real increase in what they are paid.” Fellow New York Times reporter Richard Pérez-Peña had some better news for workers: Starbucks is going to provide free online college education to thousands of workers.

The Virginian-Pilot: Obstructed exit routes and hazardous storage techniques are among the violations that OSHA inspectors found at a Missoula, Montana, Dollar Tree story. The violations could result in more than $200,000 in fines. Reporter Carolyn Shapiro quoted regional OSHA director Jeff Funke as saying: “This employer’s extensive history of ignoring basic safety standards establishes a clear pattern of intentional and complete disregard for employee safety. Employers have an obligation to keep their workers safe, and Dollar Tree keeps failing to do that.”

Los Angeles Times: An administrative sticking point may put a kink into plans to raise wages for Los Angeles hotel workers. Reporter Emily Alpert Reyes writes that the sticking point is a local ordinance that comes into effect if the industry being targeted for a wage hike is so large it could affect wages throughout the Los Angeles economy. If that is indeed the case, then local officials may have to commission an economic study on the wage hike’s effects. Reyes writes: “Labor groups and other backers of the plan argue that ramping up wages in big, non-unionized hotels would give a boost to the Los Angeles economy and steer families away from poverty. The Hotel Association of Los Angeles and other key business groups say it would force hotels to slash jobs and services.”

In another Los Angeles Times article, reporter Carolyn Kellogg writes about two worker deaths at Amazon.com fulfillment centers that OSHA is now investigating. The two workers who died were Ronald Smith, 57, who was working sorting items when he was caught by a conveyor belt and dragged; and Jody Rhodes, 52, who was operating a motorized pallet jack when it crashed into shelving. Rhodes died of multiple blunt-force injuries.

Kim Krisberg is a freelance public health writer living in Austin, Texas, and has been writing about public health for more than a decade.

Categories: Health

Worth reading: Ending drunk driving and fighting poverty

Pump Handle - June 17, 2014

A few of the recent pieces I’ve liked:

Sommer Mathis at CityLab: What If the Best Way to End Drunk Driving Is to End Driving?

Dylan Matthews at Vox: More evidence that giving poor people money is a great cure for poverty

Tressie McMillan Cottom in the Washington Post: No, college isn’t the answer. Reparations are.

Mariya Strauss at Political Research Associates: Dark Money, Dirty War: The Corporate Crusade Against Low-Wage Workers

Fred Schulte at The Center for Public Integrity: Why Medicare Advantage costs taxpayers billions more than it should

Categories: Health

Global Livestock Maps Highlight Regions Prone to Disease and Pollution

Yale Environment 360 - June 17, 2014
A new mapping tool shows the global distribution of cattle, pigs, and other livestock in high-resolution, 1-square-kilometer detail. Created by the International

Click to Enlarge

Density of pigs in China. Livestock Research Institute, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, and British and Belgian researchers, the maps are the most detailed renditions ever produced of the planet's billions of cattle, pigs, sheep, goats, chickens, and ducks. They reveal several notable trends, such as the high density of pigs in China, India's relatively high sheep and goat populations, and the affinity of the southeastern U.S. for chickens. Researchers say they will be powerful tools for tracking and predicting livestock-borne disease outbreaks, such as avian flu strains that have been linked to dense poultry markets. The maps could also predict where major livestock operations are most likely to harm the environment, researchers say. As livestock production increases, demands on land, water, and energy intensify, and so does pollution from livestock waste.
Categories: Environment, Health

Global Livestock Maps Highlight Regions Prone to Disease and Pollution

Yale Environment 360 - June 17, 2014
A new mapping tool shows the global distribution of cattle, pigs, and other livestock in high-resolution, 1-square-kilometer detail. Created by the International

Click to Enlarge

Density of pigs in China. Livestock Research Institute, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, and British and Belgian researchers, the maps are the most detailed renditions ever produced of the planet's billions of cattle, pigs, sheep, goats, chickens, and ducks. They reveal several notable trends, such as the high density of pigs in China, India's relatively high sheep and goat populations, and the affinity of the southeastern U.S. for chickens. Researchers say they will be powerful tools for tracking and predicting livestock-borne disease outbreaks, such as avian flu strains that have been linked to dense poultry markets. The maps could also predict where major livestock operations are most likely to harm the environment, researchers say. As livestock production increases, demands on land, water, and energy intensify, and so does pollution from livestock waste.
Categories: Environment, Health

A Very Productive Day, But Ready to Climb

Breast Cancer Fund - June 16, 2014
Today was a busy day for our climbers who met their rope teams, met their mountain guides, checked their gear and packed for the journey. Some people were nervous, and others felt ready to get this show on the road!...
Categories: Health

Skyscraper-Size Ice Structures Discovered at Base of Greenland Ice Sheet

Yale Environment 360 - June 16, 2014
Melting and refreezing at the base of the Greenland ice sheet has created massive, complex structures the height of skyscrapers and the width of Manhattan, according to research published in Nature Geoscience.

Click to Enlarge

Massive structures below Greenland ice sheet. The hidden formations more than a mile below the surface stand in stark contrast to the nearly flat, smooth exterior of the ice sheet and may accelerate its flow toward the sea, researchers say. Scientists had previously interpreted the irregular topography at the base of the ice as hills or mountains, but ice-penetrating radar revealed that the structures were made of ice rather than rock. Scientists from Columbia University explained that as meltwater at the bottom refreezes over hundreds or thousands of years, it radiates heat into the surrounding ice sheet, making it pick up its pace as the ice becomes softer and flows more easily. Greenland's glaciers appear to be moving more rapidly toward the sea as climate warms, but it's unclear how the refreezing process will influence this trend, researchers said.
Categories: Environment, Health
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